Small business not just another special-interest group

San Francisco Chronicle

Chronicle business columnist Thomas Lee should be embarrassed to have his name grace “Debunking the moral superiority of ‘small businesses’” — a column clearly written by someone who doesn’t understand small businesses. Our groups don’t always agree on policies affecting small businesses, but we do agree that small businesses are the foundation of our economy, and lumping them into one narrow, ideological box buys into a long-standing myth that many in the political sphere would have everyone believe.

The unfortunate truth is that lawmakers often advance policies that favor large corporations over Main Street. And here’s where Lee missed the boat: the good reputation of small-business owners is often hijacked by these very lawmakers to justify policies that have no benefit to, and in some cases harm, America’s entrepreneurs.

Small businesses are politically, socially and economically diverse. While they want to be heard on the issues that are important to them, they are hardly monolithic in their views. Lee buys in to the false notion that small-business owners are lockstep in their support of policies — a view unscrupulous lawmakers and lobbyists have spent a long time trying to foster.

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Legislation Increasing Support to SBA Investment Program a Step Forward for Entrepreneurs Looking for Capital

Huffington Post

House legislation seeks to provide greater access to capital for entrepreneurs by expanding the amount available to small business investments through the SBA’s Small Business Investment Company program

Our economy is on the upswing and reports show that business lending is on the rise, but many don’t realize that small businesses are still being left in the dust when it comes to gaining critical access to credit. In fact, recent research shows that while lending for big businesses reached record levels last year, small business lending hasn’t caught up with pre-recession levels. Our polling shows access to capital remains a persistent problem for entrepreneurs, particularly since the recession. And, while it has eased in some parts of the small business community, there are significant gaps that remain in critical areas, particularly in minority and rural communities and for women and veterans. House legislators recently introduced the Small Business Investment Company (SBIC) Capital Act of 2015 (H.R.1023), which can help address this problem by expanding the amount of capital available through small business investments.

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Why Investors Should Take Stock in Main Street

Accredited Investor Markets

One of the biggest challenges facing small business owners and entrepreneurs has been and continues to be the inability to access sufficient credit and capital. And new research shows small business lending levels are still lower than they were before the Great Recession. Though many small businesses are struggling to grow and thrive, they are still our nation’s biggest innovators and top job creators. In order to foster our economic recovery, we need to help the small business community achieve its fullest potential. It’s important for investors to know that entrepreneurship is on the rise, and investments in the small business community can be ripe with opportunity. Here are a few reasons why accredited investors should consider taking stock in small businesses again.

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Karen Mills On Investing In America’s Small Businesses

Karen Mills, former SBA Administrator, just posted a terrific blog about the importance of greater investment in America’s infrastructure to small businesses and entrepreneurs.

Ms. Mills’ remarks, presented at the 2014 America on the Move Summit at Harvard Business School, outline how investments in infrastructure will help businesses grow in the present while keeping them competitive for the future.

Check out her remarks and a recap of the event in her blog post on Huffington Post

Small Businesses Willing to Go the Distance on Long-Term Unemployment

Originally posted on The Huffington Post

If there’s one thing small business owners are always on the lookout for, it’s talent. Talented employees help them grow and thrive. But simply keeping their eyes peeled isn’t always good enough — often times they have to find creative ways to suss out the best and the brightest.

The Great Recession put many bright individuals on the unemployment line, and once someone’s been out of work for more than six months, it becomes exponentially harder to get back into the workforce. That isn’t stopping small business owners from tapping into that pool of talent, though. In fact, hundreds of entrepreneurs have already signed a letter committing to implement some best practices for recruiting and hiring the long-term unemployed. Continue reading